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Keck School of Medicine of USC urologists present latest research at the American Urological Association 2018 annual meeting
Research highlights the impact of technology on patient outcomes

LOS ANGELES, May 17, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- From robotics and machine learning to new applications for MRIs, Keck School of Medicine of USC scientists will present research highlighting the impact of technology on patient outcomes and the field of urology at the American Urological Association (AUA) 2018 annual meeting May 18–21 in San Francisco. Following are highlights from the more than 60 Keck School presentations and posters at the meeting.

Using MRI to rule out prostate cancer
A multi-institutional study has found that multiparametric MRI, which uses multiple imaging techniques, may be a useful tool help rule out prostate cancer in certain patients and could potentially help them avoid prostate biopsies. Andre Luis de Castro Abreu, MD, assistant professor of clinical urology, will discuss the study at the AUA 2018 press conference on May 19 at 8:30 a.m., and former Keck School research fellow Masakatsu Oishi, MD, PhD, will present the study on May 20, from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

How robotics is changing urologic oncologic surgery
A systematic review and meta-analysis by Keck School researchers has shown that from 2000 to 2018, robotic surgery has become increasingly more common for the three highest-volume urologic oncologic procedures: radical prostatectomy, radical cystectomy and partial nephrectomy. The data also show that as compared with open surgery, robotic surgery has better outcomes, including length of stay, complications, recurrence and mortality. Inderbir Gill, MD, chair and distinguished professor of urology, and research fellow Giovanni Cacciamani, MD, will present the research at the plenary session on May 19, from 2:20–2:30 p.m. and May 20, from 2:58–3:13 p.m.

Treating low-risk prostate cancer with targeted phototherapy
A multicenter randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of vascular-targeted phototherapy in patients with low-risk prostate cancer has found that it significantly reduces cancer progression and the need for radical prostatectomy at four years as compared with active surveillance. Vascular-targeted phototherapy involves injecting a photosensitizer intravenously, which when exposed to a targeted laser, leads to cancer cell death. Inderbir Gill, MD, chair and distinguished professor of urology, will present the research at the plenary session on May 19, from 2:20–2:30 p.m. and May 20, from 2:58–3:13 p.m.

Using machine learning to predict robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy outcomes
A study led by Keck School researchers is testing whether a machine learning method can predict patient outcomes in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy. Using performance data from a recording device connected to a robotic surgical system, the machine learning algorithms were able to predict clinical outcomes, including surgery time, length of stay and Foley catheter duration. Andrew Hung, MD, assistant professor of clinical urology, will present the research on May 21, at 9:30 a.m.

A high-velocity approach to treating benign prostatic hyperplasia
An international multicenter prospective study has found that aquablation therapy, a technique that uses a minimally invasive high-pressure, heat-free water jet, is both safe and feasible for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, commonly known as an enlarged prostate gland. Safety and efficacy endpoints included complications and prostate symptom scores at three months. Mihir Desai, MD, professor of clinical urology, will present the research on May 20, from 4–4:10 p.m.

For a comprehensive list of Keck School presentations at the meeting, visit https://keck.usc.edu/urology/wp-content/uploads/sites/44/2018/05/AUA_18-Schedule.pdf.

 

About the Keck School of Medicine of USC
Founded in 1885, the Keck School of Medicine of USC is among the nation's leaders in innovative patient care, scientific discovery, education and community service. It is part of Keck Medicine of USC, the University of Southern California's medical enterprise, one of only two university-owned academic medical centers in the Los Angeles area. This includes Keck Medical Center of USC, composed of Keck Hospital of USC and USC Norris Cancer Hospital. The two world-class, USC-owned hospitals are staffed by more than 500 physicians who are faculty at the Keck School. The school has more than 1,750 full-time faculty members and voluntary faculty of more than 2,400 physicians. These faculty direct the education of approximately 800 medical students and 1,000 students pursuing graduate and postgraduate degrees. The school trains more than 900 resident physicians in more than 50 specialty or subspecialty programs and is the largest educator of physicians practicing in Southern California. Together, the school's faculty and residents serve more than 1.5 million patients each year at Keck Hospital of USC and USC Norris Cancer Hospital, as well as USC-affiliated hospitals, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center. Keck School faculty also conduct research and teach at several research centers and institutes, including the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine at USC, USC Cardiovascular Thoracic Institute, USC Institute of Urology, USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, USC Roski Eye Institute and Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute.

In 2018, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Keck School among the top 35 medical schools in the country.

For more information, go to keck.usc.edu.

 

SOURCE Keck School of Medicine of USC

For further information: Mary Dacuma at (323) 865-7839 or [email protected]